Microsoft and the Internet:


What Will the Future Hold?

By

Teresa Cattaneo, Doug Hanniford, & Matt Kiefaber


 

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With the tremendous growth rate of users, the Internet has grown to become a very susceptible information medium with an unknown future. Those that have been users of the Internet since its creation subscribe to the early ideals that were set forth. These include an open, undominated standard in which all users can view and contribute to programs, allowing for maximum innovation and growth. Also important to these Internet pioneers are free, unlimited access to all areas of the Internet, freedom of speech and expression, and total equality among all users. With the tremendous growth rate of online users during the past few years, these pioneers fear that these ideals will be forgotten. One of their biggest concerns is that the Internet will turn into a capitalistic market in which all the original ideals will be destroyed. Even more dreadful would be if the Internet was controlled entirely by one company. Many accuse Microsoft of trying just this, monopolizing the Internet. But is Microsoft actually deviating from these ideals, following dystopian visions that may have catastrophic consequences, or are they foraging in an utopian manner, misunderstood by their competitors? Both potential positive and negative implications exist depending on what course Microsoft takes or is allowed to take. In an era defined by money and power, with Microsoft at the top in both, there is no clear idea of what the future will hold. 

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Special thanks to WEB Magazine for permission to use the above graphic.

This project was produced for Psy380, Social Psychology of Cyberspace, Spring 1998, at Miami University.

This document was created April 19, 1998 and last modified on  Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 17:34:49.
This document has been accessed 1 times since April 15, 2002.
Please send comments and suggestions to shermarc@miamioh.edu