FACULTY WORKSHOP

WRITING FOR THE PUBLIC

This program gathers faculty to work on explaining humanities research to a broad public audience.  The program runs occasionally during January term. 

In 2015, the Writing for the Public workshop was conducted by Professor Priscilla Wald of Duke University.  Professor Wald, an expert in American literature and culture, has written successfully for both academic and public audiences.  She frequently lectures to medical professionals about the history of disease and the role of narrative in shaping U.S. public health policy.  The author of two books and numerous scholarly articles, she has published opinion pieces in many newspapers, and she is interviewed regularly on radio programs.  

Professor Wald gave a public talk on Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 5 p.m.: "From Cell Lines to Bioslaves: Biotechnology and the Politics of Health."

Members of the faculty workshop met for approximately nine hours over the course of three days in January.  Members first met in pairs on Thursday, January 15 to review first drafts.  The workshop met from noon-3 p.m. on Thursday, January 22, and 9 a.m.-noon on Friday, January 23.  Depending on enrollment and progress, those sessions may run an extra hour.  

On Friday, January 23 from 2 p.m. - 3 p.m., Professor Wald also offered a session on academic publishing.  Primarily in question-and-answer format, the session offered advice on publishing articles and a first book.  Graduate students and junior faculty made up most of the audience. 

The workshop on writing for the public covered writing the op-ed, translating work for larger audiendes, and public humanities.  Each member of the workshop received significant feedback from peers and the workshop coordinator. 

Selected participants received $250 to support their research.  Participants were expected to find and discuss model essays, critique each other's work (orally and in writing), and write and revise a short article (such as an op-ed, a blog post, or an piece intended for a publication such as Slate or theconversation.com/US).

The workshop is open to all full-time faculty working in the humanities, broadly construed.  To apply, please submit a c.v. and a brief (one-paragraph) statement describing your interest in the program, including writing topics and their relation to your research.   In your statement, please indicate your position and years of service at Miami and the current status of your project. 

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