Undergraduate Program in French

 

With a major, a minor, and several thematic sequences, the Department allows undergraduates to pursue an interest in French language, cultures, and literature along several possible tracks. Many students also take advantage of the Department's summer program in Dijon, France.

Aside from a rich curriculum centered on France, the Department also offers courses on French-speaking cultures from other parts of the world, especially in north and west Africa and the Caribbean.

The Department sponsors many non-curricular ways of exploring the French-speaking world as well. We encourage students to discover our film and lecture series, language tables, and the cultural activities organized by our undergraduate clubs. Those interested in an in-depth experience should consider living in the French Language Corridor in Thomson Hall.

Students with questions about undergraduate programs in French should contact Dr. Mark McKinney, the Chief Departmental Advisor. 

 Click here for a brochure of the requirements for the French major, minor, and thematic sequences that you can print.

Click here to access the Department of French and Italian's Student Handbook.

 

Purpose of the French Major in a Liberal Education

The goal of the French major is to encourage students to learn and think critically about literature and other aspects of culture, while they develop proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking French. As students learn to analyze works from France and francophone regions, they will gain awareness of a variety of ideological, historical, and philosophical issues that are implicit in cultural texts. We believe that a liberal education should encourage critical thinking on culture from the beginning to the end of students' university careers, and indeed throughout their lives--personal and professional.

 

Requirements for the B. A. in French

The student will take 30 hours of French courses. After taking French 301, prerequisite to all 300 level courses), students will take 6 hours from FRE 302, FRE 303, or FRE 310, in no particular sequence. Of the remaining 21 hours, 18 hours will be at the 400 level, including the required 3 hour seminar (FRE 410). Students can apply only 3 hours from courses in translation toward the major. A course taken on a "credit/no credit" basis may count toward the major only upon petition and review by the Department. FRE 361, Pronunciation, does not count toward the major.

 

Requirements for French Education Majors

Major Requirements in French: 34 hours of courses at the 300 level or above. Requirements include FRE 301; two courses (6 hours) from FRE 302, FRE 303, and FRE 310; one course (3 hours) not already taken, from FRE 302, FRE 303, FRE 310, or FRE 307.L; FRE 341, FRE 361 (with a minimum of a B), and FRE 411. The remaining hours must include FRE 410 (3 credits); plus at least one course from FRE 404, FRE 423, FRE 442, FRE 451, FRE 453, FRE 454, or FRE 462. FRE 341.W (French Conversation in Dijon, France) is a recommended elective.

N.B.: Study abroad is required. FRE 411.W, in Dijon, may be taken for 4 hours by French Education majors.

 

Teacher Licensure

Students may earn an A.B. in French in the College of Arts and Science and become certified to teach by fulfilling the requirements for teacher licensure explained in the Licensure Handbook on the School of Education and Allied Professions web site.

By earning an A.B. in French with teacher licensure, often students automatically satisfy the requirements for two degrees: an A.B. in the College of Arts and Science and a B.S. in Education. Early in their programs students should carefully plan their schedules with academic advisors from both the College of Arts and Science and the School of Education and Allied Professions.

 

Advising

Those freshmen who arrive with a declared French major are contacted in the Spring semester and assigned an advisor from among the faculty. French majors should feel free to contact their advisors whenever a problem develops, or simply to discuss their academic and professional plans. Once a French major has been assigned an advisor, the advisor's name will be listed on the "Student" tab of the advisee, on the BannerWeb pages accessible on your myMIAMI web page. The assigned advisor will assist in making course selections consistent with the student's academic interests. The Chief Departmental Advisor of the department can also assist with academic planning. However, the ultimate responsibility for fulfilling all requirements rest with the student. By the second semester of the junior year, the student should also see an advisor in the College of Arts and Science to review the completion of College and University requirements.

 

Double Majors

Because the study of French language, literature, and culture relates significantly to many other major fields of study, there are numerous opportunities to graduate with a double major in French and another field. Some students even manage to do a triple major or a double major with teacher licensure. Frequently second majors include International Studies, English, Political Science, Business, History, Mass Communication, or another foreign language.

 

Minor in French

The minor in French requires 18 semester hours at the 200 level and above, with a 2.5 grade point average. Minors should note that the prerequisite to 300-level courses in French 301. Courses in translation do not count toward the minor. A course taken on a "credit/no credit" basis may count toward the minor only upon petition and review by the Department. Students are also encouraged to participate in the Dijon summer program.

 

Related Minor Programs

Students often choose to combine the French major with one or more related minors such as Italian, European Area Studies, Film Studies, and Women's Studies.

European Area Studies

Open to all majors, this minor introduces the European region from multiple perspectives of humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. It provides students at Miami's campuses, including the John E. Dolibois European Center (MUDEC) in Luxembourg or other European programs, with a framework for integrating their studies into the overall curriculum at Miami.

A minimum 2.0 GPA is required for all courses in this minor. Courses must be taken for a grade (not credit/no credit). Students planning to take this minor should consult with the chief departmental adviser.

More information is available from the European Area Studies Coordinator, Dr. Margaret Ziolkowski. Her office is located in 164 Irvin Hall  or she can be reached via phone at 513.529.1853.

 

Film Studies

The Film Studies Program (FST) offers an interdisciplinary minor that teaches students to critically examine cinema as an art form shaped by cultural forces. Within a specific context, students gain knowledge of:

  • national film cultures
  • film history
  • aesthetics
  • theory (including auteur, feminist, psychoanalytic, queer, and critical race theories)

Requirements for the minor are 18 semester hours in designated courses including FST 201 (Introduction to Film History and Criticism), and FST 401 (Seminar in Advanced Film Studies). In addition to these two courses, the student must also complete 12 semester hours of specified courses chosen in conjunction with a Film Studies advisor.

For further information, contact Dr. Vitaly Chernetsky, the Film Studies Director. His office is located in 144 Irvin Hall and he can be reached via phone at 513.529.2515.

 

Women's Studies

The Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGS) minor is an interdisciplinary program based on womanist/feminist theory and research. Courses focus on women as subjects of inquiry and critical research. This program responds to the absence of work by and about women in many courses; it provides a context in which women's work and issues are legitimate and important. In many courses; the impact of gender and other social identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, sexual orientation) on individuals' experiences is explored.

Students in any major may pursue this minor; however, choosing courses with an adviser is recommended. You may be able to receive credit for a practicum or internship in this area by petitioning the advisory committee. WGS courses may fulfill other departmental, college, or Global Miami Plan requirements.

A minimum 2.0 GPA is required for all courses in this minor. Courses must be taken for a grade (not credit/no-credit). Students planning to take this minor should consult with the chief departmental adviser.

Call 513.529.4616 or go to 126 MacMillan Hall for information and assistance in planning your program.

 

French Thematic Sequences

FRE 1 French Cultural Studies Explores cultural questions in a French context and how cultural productions can preserve or change social institutions. Provides a continuing analysis of how cultural productions interconnect with specific contexts: historical, aesthetic, social, political, economic, ethnic, racial, gender-related. Prerequisite: FRE 202 Intermediate French (MPF)
  1. FRE 310 Texts in Context (3)
  2. FRE 411 or 411.W French Civilization (3)
  3. Take one of the following:
    • FRE 341 or FRE 341.W French Conversation and Current Events (3)
    • FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3)
    • FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
    • FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation (3)
    • FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)

NOTE: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian

FRE 2 French Cultural Studies For students planning to take a capstone in another department, you may complete three of these courses, although FRE 310 (or FRE 301 or the equivalent) is a prerequisite for FRE 411.

FRE 310 Texts in Context (3)
FRE 341 or FRE 341.W French Conversation and Current Events (3)
FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3)
FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
FRE 411 or 411.W French Civilization (3)
FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation (3)
FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
NOTE: Not open to majors in the Dept. of French and Italian

FRE 3 European Cinema Explores, questions, and seeks to provide a cross-cultural understanding of the historical, ideological, artistic, and social issues that inform European culture through a critical analysis of the major films of countries that have played an important role both in the birth and development of cinematic art and in shaping the modern world: France, Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union.

  1. FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (MPF)(3), or ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (MPF)(3)
  2. Take two from the following:
    • FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
    • GER 261 Survey of German Cinema (3)
    • FST/ITL 262 Italian Cinema (3)
    • RUS 263 Soviet Cinema (3)

NOTE: 9 hours minimum must be taken outside your department of major.

 

Film Series

As part of a strong commitment to cinema, the Department organizes several film series every semester.

  • FRE/FST 366 French Cinema, offered every fall semester.
  • FRE 460/560; FST 460 Topics in French Cinema, offered every spring semester.

 

Awards and Prizes

The Department of French and Italian offers a number of awards and prizes for talented students. Contact the Chief Departmental Advisor, Dr. Mark McKinney, for any questions or to apply.

Edgar Ewing Brandon Prize -- Awarded to a senior French major.

Naomi Miller Cox French Prize -- Awarded to undergraduate French majors on the basis of academic merit.

Charlotte M. Crawford French Scholarship -- Awarded to undergraduate French majors on the basis of academic merit and financial need.

Cynthia Robinson First Memorial Scholarship -- Awarded to an undergraduate French major on the basis of academic merit.

William Marion Miller French Scholarship -- Awarded to undergraduate students taking French courses.

L. H. Skinner Award in French -- Awarded to a sophomore, junior, or senior who has at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA and is enrolled in the introductory course in French literature (FRE 301). Selection of the recipient shall be based upon the results of written exams and reports submitted by students as part of the course.

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