These Webpages are no longer maintained. We are keeping the pages here to preserve some of the early years of ProjectDragonfly, to honor the students who created the interactives in the early days of the Web, and because many of the activities are fun and people are still using them. For current Project Dragonfly work, go to:www.ProjectDragonfly.org

Thanks!

The ProjectDragonflyteam.

Percussion


Percussion instruments such as drums serve as the backbone of almost every kind of music. From marching bands, and rock & roll bands to steel pan bands (with over one hundred members playing nothing but drums) percussion instruments play a role in almost every type of music.

Perhaps not long after the earliest people figured out how to cook food, they started to make music. People in almost every culture make music. The first instruments in almost every culture were percussion instruments -- things you beat on -- drums. Just as nearly every culture developed there own cuisine, nearly every culture invented there own drums. Drums from Asia are different from drums from Africa, and African drums are different from the drums invented by Europeans and so on.

Some people think that because drums were the first instruments, they are the most primitive instruments. Those people are wrong. It is true that drums are simple to build and play, but drums are constantly being improved, and new instruments are being invented all the time. Now days, drummers can do almost everything other instrumentalists can. You can even go to a concert and hear music written for orchestras by Beethoven or Bach performed entirely on marimbas (great big xylophones) or even steel pan drums.


Listen and Learn About Different Drums

Learn to Build a Water Drum

Shipwrecked! Natural Symphony Hear the Drums Dragonfly Main

Special thanks to these Western College Program students at Miami University for their work on these pages: Devin Baty, Vann Geondoff, Jesse Brynt, and Nick Raymond.

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This document was last modified on Tuesday, September 30, 2008 at 11:51:30