Curricular & Cocurricular Examples of Practice to Promote Self-Authorship:


King, P. M., & Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2004). Creating learning partnerships in higher education: Modeling the shape, shaping the model. In M. B. Baxter Magolda & P. M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship (pp. 303-332). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

This chapter contains a step-by-step design process to construct learning partnerships. It includes an assessment and design phase. The chapter gives details and worksheets for each step as well as an example from the Haynes chapter of the book [see next entry].

Haynes, C. (2004). Promoting self-authorship through an interdisciplinary writing curriculum. In M. B. Baxter Magolda & P. M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship (pp. 63-90). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Haynes outlines how the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at Miami used the LPM to organize a four-year writing curriculum. Examples of the phases of the curriculum are included as well as assessment of its effectiveness.

Bekken, B. M., & Marie, J. (2007). Making self-authorship a goal of core curricula: The Earth Sustainability Pilot Project. In P. S. Meszaros (Ed.), Self-Authorship: Advancing students' intellectual growth, New Directions for Teaching and Learning (Vol. 109, pp. 53-67). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

This chapter details a four-semester course that was constructed using the LPM and aimed at promoting self-authorship. The detailed curriculum, which includes both developmental and content goals, offers an excellent example of how to build a developmental, cumulative curriculum.

Pizzolato, J. E. (2006). Complex partnerships: Self-authorship and provocative academic advising practices. NACADA Journal, 26(1), 32-45.

This article shares student stories about decision-making and shows how using the LPM can help students in advising contexts. Pizzolato offers specific advice for advisors.

Pizzolato, J. E., & Ozaki, C. C. (2007). Moving toward self-authorship: Investigating outcomes of learning partnerships. Journal of College Student Development, 48(2), 196-214.

This article reports the use of the LPM in an academic advising program with students who follow external formulas. Students’ stories reveal possibilities for how developmental dimensions intersect and how advising organized as a learning partnership can open the door to developmental progress.

Pizzolato, J. E. (2008). Advisor, teacher, partner: Using the Learning Partnerships Model to reshape academic advising. About Campus: Enriching the Student Learning Experience, 13(1), 18-25.

Articulates the link between development and academic decision-making using student narratives. Describes two academic advising programs that used the LPM and reports that students in the programs progressed toward self-authorship.

Haynes, C. (2006). The integrated student: Fostering holistic development to enhance learning. About Campus, 10(6), 17-23.

Haynes reports applying the concepts from her work with the four-year writing curriculum to revitalizing the honors program. She and her colleagues revised the honors program to reflect a cumulative curriculum that addressed all three dimensions of development.

Taylor, K. T. & Haynes, C. (in press). Creating a Campus-Wide Framework for Student Learning. About Campus.

Tells the story of reconceptualizing the Honors and Scholars program to reflect learning-centered practice. Conveys how student traits and development drive learning outcomes and faculty-staff expectations.

Baxter Magolda, M. B., & King, P. M. (2008). Toward reflective conversations: An advising approach that promotes self-authorship. Peer Review 10(1), 8-11.

This piece offers a conversation guide constructed on the basis of the interview for the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education. The purpose of the guide is to help educators engage students in reflective conversations – something students report is rare. The guide can be readily used in almost any student affairs arena – consider how you could use it in your routine interactions with students.

Mills, R., & Strong, K. L. (2004). Organizing for learning in a division of student affairs. In M. B. Baxter Magolda & P. M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educator for self-authorship (pp. 269-302). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

The authors outline a complete re-organization of the student affairs division at UNLV to become a learning organization. The role of learning partnerships is articulated in this process to show how the concept can be used on a larger scale.

Wildman, T. M. (2004). The Learning Partnerships Model: Framing faculty and institutional development. In M. B. Baxter Magolda & P. M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship (pp. 245-268). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

This chapter outlines various initiatives at Virginia Tech based on the LPM. In particular, it addresses the question of using these concepts in faculty development, residential learning communities, and general curricular reform.

Baxter Magolda, M. B. & Buckley, J. A. (1999). Learning scientific inquiry: Revising and creating science. In Baxter Magolda, M. B. Creating contexts for learning and self-authorship: constructive-developmental pedagogy (pp. 137-166). Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt University Press.

This chapter recounts the story of an undergraduate science course in which constructive-developmental pedagogy assisted students to develop complex ways of thinking in science.

Egart, K., & Healy, M. (2004). An Urban Leadership Internship Program: Implementing Learning Partnerships "Unplugged' from Campus Structures. In M. B. Baxter Magolda & P. M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship (pp. 125-149). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

The authors share how the LPM was used to structure this internship program. Student narratives reveal the effect of using the LPM in this context.

Piper, T. D., & Buckley, J. A. (2004). Community Standards Model: Developing learning partnerships in campus housing. In M. B. Baxter Magolda & P. M. King (Eds.), Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship (pp. 185-212). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Illustrates how community standards, a process through which students collaboratively arrive at agreements about their living environments, create learning partnerships that promote student learning and development in the residential life context.

Ignelzi, M. (2000). Meaning-making in the learning and teaching process. In M. B. Baxter Magolda (Ed.), Teaching to promote intellectual and personal maturity: Incorporating students’ worldviews and identities into the learning process, New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 82 (pp. 5-14). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

This chapter offers a useful summary of Kegan’s theory as the basis for recommendations for the educational environment that supports students’ progress along the orders of consciousness. It offers a practical view of bridge building.